Archive for the ‘Version Control’ Category

Automating Specification by Example for .NET Web Applications

February 22, 2014

If you or your organisation:

  1. are/is constrained to running your .NET tests (unit, acceptance) on-site rather than in the cloud
  2. would like some guidance on how to set-up Continuous Integration

read on.

Introduction

Purpose

Remember, an acceptance test system as a tool is only as good as the specification provided by it’s humans. The most important ingredients there-for is the relationships between the people creating the tests and the interactions performed by those people. Or as the Agile Manifesto states: Value “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools”. In order for an acceptance test system to be successful, the relationships of the Developers creating the increment and the interactions between them and the stake holders must be in good shape first. Once this is in order, you can take the next step and find some tools that will assist in creating working software that does what the stake holders want it to do.

It’s my intention that the following details will help you to create a system that automates “Specification by Example”.

The purpose of providing an automated Specification by Example Implementation, A.K.A Automated Acceptance Test System, is clearly explained here.

Do not fall into the trap of inverting the test triangle. Instead invest where it matters.

Scope

Create a system that can be triggered from

  1. Every developers workstation
  2. A build on the build machine, preferably from a best of bread build tool. TFS is not a best of bread build tool and if you want to get serious about Continuous Integration (CI), nightly builds, continuous deployment, I’d recommend not going down the path of TFS. Even Microsoft uses Git. Doesn’t that tell you something? Do you see TFS here? Last time I evaluated build tools, Jenkins previously named Hudson came out on top.

jenkins

The system will include

  1. An acceptance test framework that will run all the acceptance tests
  2. A Unit test framework. UI tests need to be run in parallel on a collection of VM’s (See the section on supported browsers for why). There are three immediately obvious approaches we could take here.
    1. We could try and rely on a unit test framework to distribute the tests. MSTest 2012 doesn’t provide the ability to run tests in parallel, but 2010 does. In order to have 2012 run tests in parallel, you can force it to use the 2012 test settings file. Only a maximum of 5 tests can be run concurrently though. Not a great option, considering it’s not going to be supported going forward.
    2.  My ParallelBrowser. If this link is not active and you’re interested in this, contact me.
    3. PNUnit. An example of how this works is here under the “PNunit Framework for writing selenium test cases” heading. I wrote the ParallelBrowser before Selenium had good support for running the same tests on multiple supported browsers. Both my ParallelBrowser and this option are reasonable options, but I’d go for the latter now. This way someone else can maintain the parallel aspect. As unless people are interested in ParallelBrowser I won’t be doing any further work on it.
  3. A Web User Interface Test Framework that will be driven by the acceptance test framework. Selenium in this case.
  4. A set of tests that run Selenium tests. These will of course need to be thread-safe.
  5. As per the Supported Browsers section, a collection of VM’s with our supported browsers installed.
    1. Each with a standalone selenium server setup with a role of webdriver. Details further on.
  6. A stand-alone selenium server setup with a role of hub

High Level Flow

Many organisations bound to .NET seem to be locked into using sub-standard tooling like TFS for their build. If you are in this predicament and can not break free, I’d suggest once all the unit tests, integration tests have run, then have the build kick off a psake script to:

  1. Clean out the existing target web app
  2. Deploy the newly built and tested web app
  3. Drop the database
  4. Create database by using latest DDL and DML scripts pulled from source control
  5. Apply any specific configurations
  6. Stop and start the target web server
  7. Run the acceptance tests which will include any Web UI tests.

If it’s within your power to choose a real CI Tool to run in-house, there are a handful of very solid contenders. A good proportion of which are free and open source.

Audience

Who ever is setting up the system. Often a developer or two. It’s important to make sure more than one person knows how it all hangs together, otherwise you have a single point of failure.

Chosen Tools

Evaluation Criterion I used

  • Who is the creator? I favour teams rather than individuals, as individuals move on often leaving projects stranded?
  • Does it do what you need it to do?
  • Does it suite the way you and your team want to work?
  • Does it integrate well with all of your other chosen components? This is based on communicating with those that have used the offerings more so than using Proof Of Concepts (POC).
  • Works with the versions of dependencies you currently use.
  • Cost in money. Is it free? Are there catches once you get further down the road? Usually open source projects are marketed as is. No catches
  • Cost in time. Is the set-up painful? Customisation feedback? Upgrade feedback?
  • How well does it appear to be supported? What do the users say?
  • Documentation. Is there any / much? What is its quality?
  • Community. Does it have an active one? Are the users getting their questions answered satisfactorily? Why are the unhappy users unhappy (do they have valid reasons).
  • Release schedule. How often are releases being made? When was the last release?
  • Intuition. How does it feel. If you have experience in making these sorts of choices, lean on it. Believe it or not, this should probably be No. 1

The following tools have been my choice based on the above criterion.

Acceptance Test Framework

The following offerings are all free and open source.

If you’re not using User Stories and/or Test Conditions, the context/specification offerings provide greater flexibility than the xBehave style frameworks. As most Scrum teams use User Stories for their Product Backlog items and drive their acceptance tests with test conditions, xBehave offerings are a great choice. In saying that, there is probably no reason why both couldn’t be used where it makes sense to do so. In this section I’ve provided the results of evaluating the current xSpec and xBehave offerings for .NET ordered by best first for the categories.

xBehave (test conditions)

SpecFlow

specflow

  • Sourcecode: https://github.com/techtalk/SpecFlow/
  • Age: Over 4 years
  • Actively maintained: Yes
  • Large number of active committers
  • Community: Lively
  • Visual Studio Plug-in has been downloaded 70 times as many times as NBehave
  • Documentation: Excellent
  • Integrates well with Selenium (I’ve setup a couple of systems using SpecFlow and it’s been a joy to work with). The stake holders loved the visibility it provided too. I discussed it here in a recent presentation.
NBehave
  • Not a lot of activity
  • Only two committers
StoryQ
  • Only two coordinators
  • Well established framework

xSpec (context/specification)

Machine.Specification (MSpec)
NSpec

Web User Interface Test Framework

selenium

For me when I look at this category of tools for .NET, Selenium is always at the top and it just keeps getting better. If anyone has any questions around Selenium, feel free to contact me or leave a comment on this post. I can’t guarantee I’ll have the answer, but I’ll try. All the documentation can be found here. I would recommend installing the Selenium IDE for initially recording tests and be sure to check-out the IDE plug-ins. All the documentation you’ll need for the IDE is here. Once you get familiar with the code it generates, you will not use it much. I would recommend using the newer Web drivers rather than the selenium server by itself. The user group is very active and looks like a good place to ask questions also. Although I haven’t needed to as there is a huge amount of documentation that’s great.

The tools I would use are detailed here. Specifically we would be using

  1. Selenium 2 (aka WebDriver)
  2. The IDE for recording tests initially
  3. Selenium Server which is used by WebDriver and RC (now considered legacy) now includes built-in grid capabilities.

Supported Browsers

What I’ve done in the past is have each of our supported versions from each supported browser vendor installed on a single VM. So each VM has all the vendors browsers installed, but just a single version obviously.

Mid Level Flow

These are the same points listed above under “High Level Flow

1. Build Kicks off PSake Script

psake

The choice to use PSake over the likes of NAant, Rake and the other build scripting languages is reasonably straight forward for me. PSake (PowerShell build scripting language) gives us access to the full .NET environment. NAnt with all it’s angle brackets, was never a very nice scripting language to use. Rake is excellent and a possible option if you have ruby installed. If you don’t, why install it if you have .NET? There are many resources for PowerShell on the inter-webs. The wiki for PSake is good.

In the case where you may have a TFS Build run, I would suggest once all the unit tests and integration tests have run, then the build kicks off a possibly pre-build and post-build psake script to perform the following operations. This is how you do this. Oh, before you try to actually run a PSake script, download and import the module, or install the NuGet package. So once you have your PSake scripts running, just start adding PowerShell scripts to do the following work. PSake is just syntactic sugar around PowerShell, so anything you can do with PS, you can do with PSake.

2. Clean out the existing target web application

Using your PSaki script, use the Web Deploy cmdlets. You will find everything you need here for it. You can also install the NuGet package.

3. Deploy the newly built and unit tested web application

As above, just use the Web Deploy cmdlets.

4. Drop the database

As above, just use the Web Deploy cmdlets.

5. Create database by using latest DDL and DML scripts pulled from source control

Database update via Application

Kind of related, but not specific to CI.

Depending on your needs, there are quite a few ways you could do this.

One way of doing this is to have your application utilise a library that determines which version of the database the application needs and be able to update the database accordingly. This library would use similar or the same upgrade scripts that we would use in this test process.

Your applications should create (if non existent) and update database on run. So all the DDL, DML code per database lives in a library. Each application that uses a specific database, references the databases DDL code library. Script all stored procedures, views, functions, triggers they’re recreated as part of a deployment scrip.

When the application is deployed, and the database created or updated, anything that must be there for the application to run out of the box should be part of the scripts, and of course versioned. This includes the part of our data that is constant or configuration data. Tables, stored procedures, views, functions and triggers. For the variable part of your data, you will need a synthetic data generation plan for testing.

Database Process for Versioning

Also related, but not specific to CI.

DBA, Devs, Product Owner and consultants must be aware of the process.

When any schema, constant data, configuration data, test data is updated… the (version controlled) scripts must also be updated, else the updates will get overwritten.

As part of the nightly build, if your supporting multiple versions of your application, you could also hydrate the collection of database versions, then run the appropriate upgrade scripts against each one, to verify the upgrades work. If any don’t, the build fails.

Create set of well defined processes that:

  1. In most cases, looks after itself
  2. Upgrades existing databases if they are not on the latest version, to the latest version
  3. Creates databases for those applications that don’t have a database
  4. Informs the user on deployment if the database is corrupt, or can not be upgraded
  5. Outlines who is responsible for, and who may update the DDL and DML scripts for your projects
  6. Clearly documents that any changes made to any databases by un-authorised personal will more than likely be overwritten.

A User Story for this might look something like the following:

As the team, we need to create a set of well defined processes that clearly outline what is required in regards to setting up the development teams database versioning, creation, upgrade systems and processes strategy for our organisations databases. So that all team personal are aware of the benefits and dangers of making changes to the databases, and understand the change process.

Possibly useful tools

1. DB Ghost
2. http://www.red-gate.com/products/sql-development/sql-source-control/index-2
3. http://www.sqlaccessories.com/SQL_Data_Examiner/

6. Apply any specific configurations

As above, just use the Web Deploy cmdlets.

7. Stop and start the target web server

As above, just use the Web Deploy cmdlets.

8. Run the acceptance tests which will include any Web UI tests

As above, just use the Web Deploy cmdlets.

  1. Start each VM that hosts a set of browsers you want to use to farm your tests out to. From memory, you do not need to start each browser. There are of course many ways to do this. PS provides the following cmdlets Start-VM and Stop-VM. These would be my first options.
  2. Start the selenium standalone server. All details found here. Or just work through the “Distributed Testing with Selenium Grid” chapter until you get to the “Creating and executing Selenium script in parallel with TestNG” heading, at which point switch to this documentation to replace TestNG with PNUnit.

If I’ve failed to explain anything in enough detail for you, drop me a message below and I’ll do my best to help 🙂

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How to Increase Software Developer Productivity

March 2, 2013

Is your organisation:

  • Wanting to get more out of your Software Developers?
  • Wanting to increase RoI?
  • Spending too much money fixing bugs?
  • Development team not releasing business value fast enough?
  • Maybe your a software developer and you want to lift your game to the next level?

If any of these points are of concern to you… read on.

There are many things we can do to lift a software developers productivity and thus the total output of The Development Team. I’m going to address some quick and cheap wins, followed by items that may take a little longer to implement, but non the less, will in many cases provide even greater results.

What ever it takes to remove friction and empower your software developers to work with the least amount of interruptions, do it.
Allow them to create a space that they love working in. I know when I work from home my days are far more productive than when working for a company that insists on cramming as many workers around you into a small space as possible. Chitter chatter from behind, both sides and in front of you will not help one get their mind into a state of deep thought easily.

I have included thoughts from Nicholas C. Zakas post to re-iterate the common fallacies uttered by non-engineers.

  • I don’t understand why this is such a big deal. Isn’t it just a few lines of code? (Technically, everything is a few lines of code. That doesn’t make it easy or simple.)
  • {insert name here} says it can be done in a couple of days. (That’s because {insert name here} already has perfect knowledge of the solution. I don’t, I need to learn it first.)
  • What can we do to make this go faster? Do you need more engineers? (Throwing more engineers at a problem frequently makes it worse. The only way to get something built faster is to build a smaller thing.)

Screen real estate

When writing code, a software developers work requires a lot of time spent deep in thought. Holding multiple layers of complexity within immediately accessible memory.
One of the big wins I’ve found that helps with continuity, is maximising your screen real estate.
I’ve now moved up to 3 x 27″ 2560×1440 IPS flat panels. These are absolutely gorgeous to look at/work with.
Software development generally requires a large number of applications to be running at any one time.
For example in any average session for me, I generally have somewhere around 30 windows open.
The more screen real estate a developer has, the less he/she has to fossick around for what he/she needs and switch between them.
Also, the less brain cycles he/she has to spend locating that next running application, means the more cycles you have in order to do real work.
So, the less gap there is switching between say one code editor and another, the easier it is for a developer to keep the big picture in memory.
We’re looking at:

  1. physical screen size
  2. total pixel count

The greater real estate available (physical screen size and pixel count) the more information you can have instant access to, which means:

  • less waiting
  • less memory loss
  • less time spent rebuilding structures in your head
  • greater continuity

Which then gives your organisation and developers:

  • greater productivity
  • greater RoI

These screens are cheaper than many realise. I set these up 4 months ago. They continue to drop in price.

  1. FSM-270YG 27″ PC Monitor LED S-IPS WIDE 2560×1440 16:9 WQHD DVI-D $470.98 NZD
  2. [QH270-IPSMS] Achieva ShiMian HDMI DVI D-Sub 27″ LG LED 2560×1440 $565.05 NZD
  3. [QH270-IPSMS] Achieva ShiMian HDMI DVI D-Sub 27″ LG LED 2560×1440 $565.05 NZD

It’s just simply not worth not to upgrading to these types of panels.

korean monitors

In this setup, I’m running Linux Mint Maya. Besides the IPS panels, I’m using the following hardware.

  • Video card: 1 x Gigabyte GV-N650OC-2GI GTX 650 PCIE
  • PSU: 1200w Corsair AX1200 (Corsair AX means no more PSU troubles (7 yr warranty))
  • CPU: Intel Core i7 3820 3.60GHz (2011)
  • Mobo: Asus P9X79
  • HDD: 1TB Western Digital WD10EZEX Caviar Blue
  • RAM: Corsair 16GB (2x8GB) Vengeance Performance Memory Module DDR3 1600MHz

One of the ShiMian panels is using the VGA port on the video card as the FSM-270YG only supports DVI.
The other ShiMian and the FSM-270YG are hooked up to the 2 DVI-D (dual link) ports on the video card. The two panels feeding on the dual link are obviously a lot clearer than the panel feeding on the VGA. Also I can reduce the size of the text considerably giving me greater clarity while reading, while enabling me to fit a lot more information on the screens.

With this development box, I’m never left waiting for the machine to catchup with my thought process.
So don’t skimp on hardware. It just doesn’t make sense any way you look at it.

Machine Speed

The same goes for your machine speed. If you have to wait for your machine to do what you’ve commanded it to do and at the same time try and keep a complex application structure in your head, the likelihood of loosing part of that picture increases. Plus your brain has to work harder to hold the image in memory while your trying to maintain continuity of thought. Again using precious cycles for something that shouldn’t be required rather than on the essential work. When a developer looses part of this picture, they have to rebuild it again when the machine finishes executing the last command given. This is re-work that should not be necessary.

An interesting observation from Joel Spolsky:

“The longer it takes to task switch, the bigger the penalty you pay for multitasking.
OK, back to the more interesting topic of managing humans, not CPUs. The trick here is that when you manage programmers, specifically, task switches take a really, really, really long time. That’s because programming is the kind of task where you have to keep a lot of things in your head at once. The more things you remember at once, the more productive you are at programming. A programmer coding at full throttle is keeping zillions of things in their head at once: everything from names of variables, data structures, important APIs, the names of utility functions that they wrote and call a lot, even the name of the subdirectory where they store their source code. If you send that programmer to Crete for a three week vacation, they will forget it all. The human brain seems to move it out of short-term RAM and swaps it out onto a backup tape where it takes forever to retrieve.”

Many of my posts so far have been focused on productivity enhancements. Essentially increasing RoI. This list will continue to grow.

Coding Standards and Guidelines

Agreeing on a set of Coding Standards and Guidelines and policing them (generally by way of code reviews and check-in commit scripts) means software developers get to spend less time thinking about things that they don’t need to and get to throw more time at the real problems.

For example:

Better Tooling

Improving tool sets has huge gains in productivity. In most cases many of the best tools are free. Moving from the likes of non distributed source control systems to best of bread distributed.

There are many more that should be considered.

Wiki

Implementing an excellent Wiki that is easy to use. I’ve put a few wiki’s in place now and have used even more. My current pick of the bunch would have to be Atlassians Confluence. I’ve installed this on a local server and also migrated the instance to their cloud. There are varying plans and all very reasonably priced with excellent support. If the wiki you’re planning on using is not as intuitive as it could be, developers just wont use it. So don’t settle for anything less.

Improving Processes

Code Reviews

Also a very important step in all successful development teams and often a discipline that must be satisfied as part of Scrums Definition of Done (DoD). What this gives us is high quality designs and code, conforming to the coding standards. This reduces defects, duplicate code (DRY) and enforces easily readable code as the reviewer has to understand it. Saves a lot of money in re-work.

Cost of Change

Scott Amblers Cost of change curve

Definition of Done (DoD)

Get The Team together and decide on what it means to have each Product Backlog Item that’s pulled into the Sprint Done.
Here’s an example of a DoD that one of my previous Development Teams compiled:

Definition of Done

What does Done actually mean?

Come Sprint Review on the last day of the Sprint, everyone knows what it means to be done. There is no “well I thought it was Done because I’ve written the code for it, but it’s not tested yet”.

Continuous Integration (CI)

There are many tools and ways to implement CI. What does CI give you? Visibility of code quality, adherence to standards, reports on cyclomatic complexity, predictability and quite a number of other positive side effects. You’ll know as soon as the code fails to build and/or your fast running tests (unit tests) fail. This means The Development Team don’t keep writing code on top of faulty code, thus reducing technical debt by not having to undo changes on changes later down the track.
I’ve used a number of these tools and have carried out extensive research and evaluation spikes on a number of the most popular offerings. In order of preference, the following are my candidates.

  1. Jenkins (free and open source, with a great community)
  2. TeamCity
  3. Atlassian Bamboo

Release Plans

Make sure you have these. This will reduce confusion and provide a clear definition of the steps involved to get your software out the door. This will reduce the likelihood of screwing up a release and re-work being required. You’ll definitely need one of these for the next item.

Here’s an example of a release notes guideline I wrote for one of the previous companies I worked for.

release notes

Continuous Deployment

If using Scrum, The Scrum Team will be forecasting a potentially releasable Increment (the sum of all the Product Backlog items completed during a Sprint and all previous Sprints).
You may decide to actually release this. When you do, you can look at the possibility of automating this deployment. Thus reducing the workload of the release manager or who ever usually deploys (often The Development Team in a Scrum environment). This has the added benefit of consistency, predictability, reliability and of course happy customers. I’ve also been through this process of research and evaluation on the tools available and the techniques to implement.

Here’s a good podcast that got me started. I’ve got a collection of other resources if you need them and can offer you my experience in this process. Just leave a comment.

Implement Scrum (and not the Flaccid flavour)

I hope this goes without saying?
Implementing Scrum to provide ultimate visibility

Get maximum quality out of the least money spent

How to get the most out of your limited QA budget

Driving your designs with tests, thus creating maintainable code, thus reducing technical debt.

Hold Retrospectives

Scrum is big on continual inspection and adaption, self-organisation and fostering innovation. The military have another term for inspection and adaption. It’s called the OODA Loop.
The Retrospective is just one of the Scrum Events that enable The Scrum Team to continually inspect the way they are doing things and improve the way they develop and deliver business value.

Invest a little into your servant leaders

Empowering the servant leaders.

Context Switching

Don’t do it. This is a real killer.
This is hard. What you need to do is be aware of how much productivity is killed with each switch. Then do everything in your power to make sure your Development Team is sheltered from as much as possible. There are many ways to do this. For starters, you’re going to need as much visibility as possible into how much this is currently happening. track add-hock requests and any other types of interruptions that steel the developers concentration. In the last Scrum Team that I was Scrum Master of, The Development Team decided to include another metric to the burn down chart that was on the middle of the wall, clearly visible to all. Every time one of the developers was interrupted during a Sprint, they would record this time, the reason and who interrupted them, on the burn down chart. The Scrum Team would then address this during the Retrospective and empirically address why this happened and work out how to stop it happening every Sprint. Jeff Atwood has an informative post on why and how context-switching/multitasking kills productivity. Be sure to check it out.

As always, if anything I’ve mentioned isn’t completely clear, or you have any questions, please leave a comment 🙂

Painless git diff

February 2, 2013

I’ve been using Node.js quite a bit lately and decided it was time to start using Git for my projects.

I’m used to using Mercurial (Hg) for DVCS, but have only used it on Windows and a little on Linux via command line.

I was looking for a similar experience that Windows gave me for Hg (file explorer integration with tortoisehg), but for Linux. I had created a repository using tortoisehg. When I attempted to add files to the repository using tortoisehg or straight from the command line, I was getting a few errors. tortoisehg, nautilus integration is broken on my distro at the time of writing this too. So this encouraged me to invest a little more time in Git. I had done a bit of reading and listened to a few good podcasts on Git, so I felt it was a good time.
think like a git is also good for a read.

As I was creating repositories, dealing with remote repositories, cloning, setting up all the config files, adding, committing, pulling, pushing, viewing status and diffing. What I quickly came to realise, was that the Git commands were very extensive, made more sense to me than Hg, and there is a lot of good documentation around. In saying that, it’s been a while since I used hg from the command line and most of my work has been through the GUI tools.

One area I was struggling with was the diffing of files and directories on the command line. There are a couple of good ways to make this experience a lot more pleasurable.
I like using meld on Linux for my file and directory comparisons, so already had that installed.

git diff

Create a bash file in the /bin directory.
I called it git-meld, and it looks like the following:

#!/bin/bash
meld $2 $5

Turn the executable bit on, so it can be executed.

chmod git-meld +x

Now modify your ~/.gitconfig file

git config --global diff.external git-meld

To make sure your’ve added git-meld as the script that’ll run meld with the correct parameters:

cat .gitconfig

and you should see at least the following:

[diff]
external = git-meld

Now that should be all you need to get git to pop meld on diff.

git diff [options] <commit> <commit> [<path_to_file_to_compare>]

If you have a stack of files (rather than just one, as shown in my above example) that were changed between these commits, diff will pop each file open in meld. One at a time until you’ve finished with each one

meld

git difftool

git also comes with difftool. I found this really nice to use. There is no setting up for it. All you do is replace the diff command with difftool. Optionally you can specify the GUI diff tool you want to use, simply by appending -t [your_GUI_diff_tool] like this if you like using meld.

git difftool -t meld <commit> <commit> [<path_to_file_to_compare>]

If you do this without specifying the file you want to compare, you are prompted if you want to view each file, rather than how diff works by just opening every one.

Launchmeld

If you choose to leave the -t option out, difftool will give you the option of all the possible tools able to perform the diff (some of which may need installation).

multiple diff tools

So using difftool is a better diff IMHO. This is how git difftool behaves whether or not you set up ~/.gitconfig file with your prefered diff tool.

DVCS vs CVCS

December 3, 2011

Some differences between Distributed Version Control Systems (DVCS) and Centralised Version Control Systems (CVCS)

The central server dilemma

I hear a number of people being fearful about what they hear about DVCS not having a central repository.
In most cases this is not entirely true.
There are a number of DVCS models that work very well utilising one or more central servers.
In fact all the DVCS I’ve worked with or set-up have used one or more central repositories.

One of the key differences between Distributed and Centralised.
Is with distributed, the authoritative or central source is the source you want it to be, rather than being constrained by the system into having to have your source in one place.
There has been occasions where we have had to use one of the developers local repositories when the central server has been down.
This is simply making a decision that the entire team is aware of, that you are going to push / pull to / from an alternative repository.
Hg has it’s own inbuilt web server, so this is very easy to do.

One of the big advantages with a DVCS is the flexibility.
With increased flexibility and power, comes the increased likelihood of someone screwing something up.
Personally I’d much rather have the extra flexibility.

Branching Merging

Is easy and encouraged in DVCS.
DVCS are designed with branching and merging to be a common task.
Therefore they do it well, and some of the paranoia around this concept is no longer justified when you go distributed.

Mercurial (Hg) vs Git commits

Both Hg and Git are distributed.
Git has this extra step between your working directory and your repository called the Index (strangely enough)
All changes in git go into a staging area, then into your repository.
The index is used to combine a set of changes that you want to commit as one operation.
When you commit, what is committed is the contents of your index rather than your working directory.

The idea of the index, is that some of the history is erased once a commit is made, as multiple changes and their details are wrapped into a single commit.
There is a philosophical debate as to which way is better.
Is it better to have every change recorded, or is it better to have a bunch of changes wrapped into an atomic change, so that some detail is negated.
I’m kind of on the fence about this one, as I think there are pros and cons for both arguments.

Interfacing with Hg and Git for Windows users

There are currently several options here.

command line

file explorer

  1. TortoiseHg
  2. TortoiseGit
  3. GitExtensions for Explorer and Visual Studio integration

For Visual Studio users

  1. Git Source Control Provider also http://gitscc.codeplex.com/
  2. VisualHg

Password-less Repository Authentication for Mercurial

June 3, 2011

I setup a free account a short while ago at bitbucket with the intention of creating a version control repository for Hg.
So far this has worked out well.

Although every time I communicated with the back end repo I’d have to enter my credentials.
I realized if I added my user name to the URL, I’d only receive a password prompt.

https://MyUserName@bitbucket.org/MyUserName/MyRepoName

If I also added my password in the URL I wouldn’t be prompted for anything.

https://MyUserName:MyPassword@bitbucket.org/MyUserName/MyRepoName

Obviously I didn’t want to be entering this each time I communicated with my back end repo,
also especially with my password in plain text on the screen.
So I did a little research.

TortoiseHg comes bundled with the keyring extension.
So if your using TortoiseHg you don’t even have to install it.
Just add the following to your mercurial.ini file in your user directory.

[extensions]
mercurial_keyring=

You’ll also have to edit your repository specific hgrc file.
If this file doesn’t already exist, create it.

[paths]
bitbucket = https://LethalDuck@bitbucket.org/LethalDuck/code-scripts
default = https://LethalDuck@bitbucket.org/LethalDuck/code-scripts

You could put your password in the above URL too, but that kind of defeats the purpose of using the keyring.
So you associate your username with the URL you are wanting to communicate with.
Now you can add as many URL’s as you like.
As you can see I’ve just added the same one twice, as an experiment to see how it’s handled.
In Repository Explorer, it’ll look like this…

Now when you select either of the URL’s to push to or pull from,
the keyring will prompt for your password once and store it encrypted.

After that, the stored encrypted password is used
and no more prompt.

Resources:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1997601/store-password-in-tortoisehg

VisualHG works nicely in VS 2010 rtm

November 20, 2010

 

For the uninitiated…
VisualHG is a Mercurial source control plugin for MS Visual Studio

 

 

 

 

I had a bit of a problem with VisualHG a couple of weeks ago.
The overlay icons work in Visual Studio, but the context menu had no VisualHG icons and the VisualHG toolbar was inactive (had all the buttons greyed out).

Tried uninstalling / reinstalling visualhg.
Version: Visual Studio 2010 Version 10.0.30319.1 RTMRel Premium.
OS used: Windows 7 Enterprise x64.
VisualHG 1.1.0 installed.
Seems to work in VS 2008 though.

Solution

Remove all instances of VisualHG in Programs and Features.
Search the Program Files and Program Files (x86) for instances of visualhg and remove if they exist.
Search the registry for VisualHG related items (entries as well as keys). Delete them all.
Reinstall the latest version of VisualHG (currently 1.1.0).

Posts and links that provided resolution:
http://visualhg.codeplex.com/Thread/View.aspx?ThreadId=209792
http://visualhg.codeplex.com/workitem/36

Distributed Version Control the solution?

October 3, 2010

Due to the fact that I am starting to need a Version Control System at home for my own work and the company I currently work for during the day could potentially benefit from a real Version Control System.

I’ve set out to do an R&D spike on what is available and would best suite the above mentioned needs.
I’ve looked at a large range of products available.

At this stage, due to my research and in talking to some highly regarded technical friends and other people about their experiences with different systems, I’ve narrowed them down to the following.

Subversion, Git and Mercurial (or hg)
Subversion is server based.
Git and hg are distributed (Distributed Version Control System (DVCS)).

The two types of VCS and some of their attributes.

Centralised (or traditional)

  • Is better than no version control.
  • Serves as a single backup.
  • Server maintenance can be time consuming and costly.
  • You should be able to be confident that the server has your latest changeset.

Distributed

  • Maintenance needs are significantly reduced, due to a number of reasons. One of which is… No central server is required.
  • Each peer’s working copy of the codebase is a complete clone.
  • There is no need to be connected to a central network. Which means users can work productively, even when network connectivity is unavailable.
  • Uses a peer-to-peer approach rather than a client-server approach that the likes of Subversion use.
  • Removes the need to rely on a single machine as a single point of failure.
    Although it is often a good idea to have a server that is always online and ready to accept changesets.
    As you don’t always know whether another peer has accepted all your changes or is online.
  • Most operations are much faster than the centralised model, as no network is involved.
  • Each copy of the repository effectively acts as a remote backup. Which has multiple benefits.
  • There is no canonical code base, only working copies.
  • Operations such as commits, viewing history and rolling back are fast, because there is no need to communicate with a central server.
  • A web of trust is used to merge code from disparate repositories.
  • Branching and Merging made easier.
  • No forced structure: a central server can be implemented or peers can control the codebase.
  • Although I don’t see huge benefits for a central server in my target scenario.
  • Buddy builds. A team member can pass a change set to another member to try before committing to a central location.
    This would stop broken CI builds.
  • There is a huge amount of flexibility with your layout.
  • With a well planned layout a Distributed Version Control System can do anything a Centralised system can do, with the additional benefit of easy merges.

In weighing up the pros and cons of distributed versus the centralised model.

I think for my target requirements,
a distributed system has more to offer in the way of time savings and hardware savings.
This page has a good explanation of the differences between Centralised and Distributed.
Here is a detailed list of comparisons of some of the more common systems.

Mercurial is ticking quite a few boxes for me.
Mercurial has a VisualStudio plug-in.
There is a GUI available for windows platforms and others that integrates Mercurial directly into your explorer.
It’s free, open, and being actively maintained.
Projects using Mercurial.

Mercurial is written in Python, which is another plus for me.
Binaries are freely available for Windows, GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, OpenSolaris.
The source is also available, so you can build it for most platforms.

Plenty of documentation here, plus the book.

Installation and Configuration. Covering Windows, Debian and more.
TortoiseHg has binaries for windows and debian, but only for Squeeze onwards by the look of it.
If your running Lenny, you can just use hg. apt-get install mercurial.
When I downloaded and installed the 64 bit version of TortoiseHg (v1.1.3 hg v1.6.3), it came with 4 comprehensive documents.

  1. Mercurial: The Definitive Guide 2010-02-21 as pdf
  2. TortoiseHg v1.1.3 Documentation in both pdf and chm
  3. Mercurial Command Reference

Very nice!
Turn off the indexing service on the working copies and repositories, and exclude them from virus scans
.
Can also get TortoiseHg here (For Debian, TortoiseHq isn’t available for Lenny).
Click the Tutorial link for the Quick start guide to TortoiseHg.

Once installed, start working through the following links.
http://tortoisehg.bitbucket.org/manual/1.1/quick.html
http://mercurial.aragost.com/kick-start/basic.html

Comments or thoughts?