Posts Tagged ‘Web Application Security’

Captcha Considerations

December 31, 2015

Risks

Exploiting Captcha

Lack of captchas are a risk, but so are captchas themselves…

Let’s look at the problem here? What are we trying to stop with captchas?

Bots submitting. What ever it is, whether:

  • Advertising
  • Creating an unfair advantage over real humans
  • Link creation in attempt to increase SEO
  • Malicious code insertion

You are more than likely not interested in accepting it.

What do we not want to block?

People submitting genuinely innocent input. If a person is prepared to fill out a form manually, even if it is spam, then a person can view the submission and very quickly delete the validated, filtered and possibly sanitised message.

Countermeasures

PreventionVERYEASY

Types

Text Recognition

recaptcha uses this technique. See below for details.

Image Recognition

Uses images which users have to perform certain operations on, like dragging them to another image. For example: “Please drag all cat images to the cat mat.”, or “Please select all images of things that dogs eat.” sweetcaptcha is an example of this type of captcha. This type completely rules out the visually impaired users.

Friend Recognition

Pioneered by… you guessed it. Facebook. This type of captcha focusses on human hackers, the idea being that they will not know who your friends are.

Instead of showing you a traditional captcha on Facebook, one of the ways we may help verify your identity is through social authentication. We will show you a few pictures of your friends and ask you to name the person in those photos. Hackers halfway across the world might know your password, but they don’t know who your friends are.

I disagree with that statement. A determined hacker will usually be able to find out who your friends are. There is another problem, do you know who all of your friends are? Every acquaintance? I am terrible with names and so are many people. This is supposed to be used to authenticate you. So you have to be able to answer the questions before you can log in.

Logic Questions

This is what textcaptcha uses. Simple logic questions designed for the intelligence of a seven year old child. These are more accessible than image and textual image recognition, but they can take longer than image recognition to answer, unless the user is visually impared. The questions are usually language specific also, usually targeting the English language.

User Interaction

This is a little like image recognition. Users have to perform actions that virtual intelligence can not work out… yet. Like dragging a slider a certain number of notches.
If an offering gets popular, creating some code to perform the action may not be that hard and would definitely be worth the effort for bot creators.
This is obviously not going to work for the visually impaired or for people with handicapped motor skills.

 

In NPM land, as usual there are many options to choose from. The following were the offerings I evaluated. None of which really felt like a good fit:

Offerings

  • total-captcha. Depends on node-canvas. Have to install cairo first, but why? No explanation. Very little of anything here. Move on. How does this work? Do not know. What type is it? Presume text recognition.
  • easy-captcha is a text recognition offering generating images
  • simple-captcha looks like another text recognition offering. I really do not want to be writing image files to my server.
  • node-captcha Depends on canvas. By the look of the package this is another text recognition in a generated image.
  • re-captcha was one of the first captcha offerings, created at the Carnegie Mellon University by Luis von Ahn, Ben Maurer, Colin McMillen, David Abraham and Manuel Blum who invented the term captcha. Google later acquired it in September 2009. recaptcha is a text recognition captcha that uses scanned text that optical character recognition (OCR) technology has failed to interpret, which has the added benefit of helping to digitise text for The New York Times and Google Books.
    recaptcha
  • sweetcaptcha uses the sweetcaptcha cloud service of which you must abide by their terms and conditions, requires another node package, and requires some integration work. sweetcaptcha is an image recognition type of captcha.
    sweetcaptcha
  • textcaptcha is a logic question captcha relying on an external service for the questions and md5 hashes of the correct lower cased answers. This looks pretty simple to set up, but again expects your users to use their brain on things they should not have to.

 

After some additional research I worked out why the above types and offerings didn’t feel like a good fit. It pretty much came down to user experience.

Why should genuine users/customers of your web application be disadvantaged by having to jump through hoops because you have decided you want to stop bots spamming you? Would it not make more sense to make life harder for the bots rather than for your genuine users?

Some other considerations I had. Ideally I wanted a simple solution requiring few or ideally no external dependencies, no JavaScript required, no reliance on the browser or anything out of my control, no images and it definitely should not cost any money.

Alternative Approaches

  • Services like Disqus can be good for commenting. Obviously the comments are all stored somewhere in the cloud out of your control and this is an external dependency. For simple text input, this is probably not what you want. Similar services such as all the social media authentication services can take things a bit too far I think. They remove freedoms from your users. Why should your users be disadvantaged by leaving a comment or posting a message on your web application? Disqus tracks users activities from hosting website to website whether you have an account, are logged in or not. Any information they collect such as IP address, web browser details, installed add-ons, referring pages and exit links may be disclosed to any third party. When this data is aggregated it is useful for de-anonymising users. If users choose to block the Disqus script, the comments are not visible. Disqus has also published its registered users entire commenting histories, along with a list of connected blogs and services on publicly viewable user profile pages. Disqus also engage in add targeting and blackhat SEO techniques from the websites in which their script is installed.
  • Services like Akismet and Mollom which take user input and analyse for spam signatures. Mollom sometimes presents a captcha if it is unsure. These two services learn from their mistakes if they mark something as spam and you unmark it, but of course you are going to have to be watching for that. Matt Mullenweg created Akismet so that his mother could blog in safety. “His first attempt was a JavaScript plugin which modified the comment form and hid fields, but within hours of launching it, spammers downloaded it, figured out how it worked, and bypassed it. This is a common pitfall for anti-spam plugins: once they get traction“. My advice to this is not to use a common plugin, but to create something custom. I discuss this soon.

The above solutions are excellent targets for creating exploits that will have a large pay off due to the fact that so many websites are using them. There are exploits discovered for these services regularly.

Still not cutting it

Given the fact that many clients count on conversions to make money, not receiving 3.2% of those conversions could put a dent in sales. Personally, I would rather sort through a few SPAM conversions instead of losing out on possible income.

Casey Henry: Captchas’ Effect on Conversion Rates

Spam is not the user’s problem; it is the problem of the business that is providing the website. It is arrogant and lazy to try and push the problem onto a website’s visitors.

Tim Kadlec: Death to Captchas

User Time Expenditure

Recording how long it takes from fetch to submit. This is another technique, in which the time is measured from fetch to submit. For example if the time span is under five seconds it is more than likely a bot, so handle the message accordingly.

Bot Pot

Spamming bots operating on custom mechanisms will in most cases just try, then move on. If you decide to use one of the common offerings from above, exploits will be more common, depending on how wide spread the offering is. This is one of the cases where going custom is a better option. Worse case is you get some spam and you can modify your technique, but you get to keep things simple, tailored to your web application, your users needs, no external dependencies and no monthly fees. This is also the simplest technique and requires very little work to implement.

Spam bots:

  • Love to populate form fields
  • Usually ignore CSS. For example, if you have some CSS that hides a form field and especially if the CSS is not inline on the same page, they will usually fail at realising that the field is not supposed to be visible.

So what we do is create a field that is not visible to humans and is supposed to be kept empty. On the server once the form is submitted, we check that it is still empty. If it is not, then we assume a bot has been at it.

This is so simple, does not get in the way of your users, yet very effective at filtering bot spam.

Client side:

form .bot-pot {
   display: none;
}
<form>
   <!--...-->
   <div>
      <input type="text" name="bot-pot" class="bot-pot">
   </div>
   <!--...-->
</form>

Server side:

I show the validation code middle ware of the route on line 30 below. The validation is performed on line 16

var form = require('express-form');
var fieldToValidate = form.field;
//...

function home(req, res) {
   res.redirect('/');
}

function index(req, res) {
   res.render('home', { title: 'Home', id: 'home', brand: 'your brand' });
}

function validate() {
   return form(
      // Bots love to populate everything.
      fieldToValidate('bot-pot').maxLength(0)
   );
}

function contact(req, res) {

   if(req.form.isValid)
      // We know the bot-pot is of zero length. So no bots.
   //...
}

module.exports = function (app) {
   app.get('/', index);
   app.get('/home', home);
   app.post('/contact', validate(), contact);
};

So as you can see, a very simple solution. You could even consider combining the above two techniques.

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Lack of Visibility in Web Applications

November 26, 2015

Risks

I see this as an indirect risk to the asset of web application ownership (That’s the assumption that you will always own your web application).

Not being able to introspect your application at any given time or being able to know how the health status is, is not a comfortable place to be in and there is no reason you should be there.

Insufficient Logging and Monitoring

average-widespread-veryeasy-moderate

Can you tell at any point in time if someone or something is:

  • Using your application in a way that it was not intended to be used
  • Violating policy. For example circumventing client side input sanitisation.

How easy is it for you to notice:

  • Poor performance and potential DoS?
  • Abnormal application behaviour or unexpected logic threads
  • Logic edge cases and blind spots that stake holders, Product Owners and Developers have missed?

Countermeasures

As Bruce Schneier said: “Detection works where prevention fails and detection is of no use without response“. This leads us to application logging.

With good visibility we should be able to see anticipated and unanticipated exploitation of vulnerabilities as they occur and also be able to go back and review the events.

Insufficient Logging

PreventionAVERAGE

When it comes to logging in NodeJS, you can’t really go past winston. It has a lot of functionality and what it does not have is either provided by extensions, or you can create your own. It is fully featured, reliable and easy to configure like NLog in the .NET world.

I also looked at express-winston, but could not see why it needed to exist.

{
   ...
   "dependencies": {
      ...,
      "config": "^1.15.0",
      "express": "^4.13.3",
      "morgan": "^1.6.1",
      "//": "nodemailer not strictly necessary for this example,",
      "//": "but used later under the node-config section.",
      "nodemailer": "^1.4.0",
      "//": "What we use for logging.",
      "winston": "^1.0.1",
      "winston-email": "0.0.10",
      "winston-syslog-posix": "^0.1.5",
      ...
   }
}

winston-email also depends on nodemailer.

Opening UDP port

with winston-syslog seems to be what a lot of people are using. I think it may be due to the fact that winston-syslog is the first package that works well for winston and syslog.

If going this route, you will need the following in your /etc/rsyslog.conf:

$ModLoad imudp
# Listen on all network addresses. This is the default.
$UDPServerAddress 0.0.0.0
# Listen on localhost.
$UDPServerAddress 127.0.0.1
$UDPServerRun 514
# Or the new style configuration.
Address <IP>
Port <port>
# Logging for your app.
local0.* /var/log/yourapp.log

I Also looked at winston-rsyslog2 and winston-syslogudp, but they did not measure up for me.

If you do not need to push syslog events to another machine, then it does not make much sense to push through a local network interface when you can use your posix syscalls as they are faster and safer. Line 7 below shows the open port.

root@kali:~# nmap -p514 -sU -sV <target IP> --reason

Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org )
Nmap scan report for kali (<target IP>)
Host is up, received arp-response (0.0015s latency).
PORT STATE SERVICE REASON VERSION
514/udp open|filtered syslog no-response
MAC Address: 34:25:C9:96:AC:E0 (My Computer)

Using Posix

The winston-syslog-posix package was inspired by blargh. winston-syslog-posix uses node-posix.

If going this route, you will need the following in your /etc/rsyslog.conf instead of the above:

# Logging for your app.
local0.* /var/log/yourapp.log

Now you can see on line 7 below that the syslog port is no longer open:

root@kali:~# nmap -p514 -sU -sV <target IP> --reason

Starting Nmap 6.47 ( http://nmap.org )
Nmap scan report for kali (<target IP>)
Host is up, received arp-response (0.0014s latency).
PORT STATE SERVICE REASON VERSION
514/udp closed syslog port-unreach
MAC Address: 34:25:C9:96:AC:E0 (My Computer)

Logging configuration should not be in the application startup file. It should be in the configuration files. This is discussed further under the Store Configuration in Configuration files section.

Notice the syslog transport in the configuration below starting on line 39.

module.exports = {
   logger: {
      colours: {
         debug: 'white',
         info: 'green',
         notice: 'blue',
         warning: 'yellow',
         error: 'yellow',
         crit: 'red',
         alert: 'red',
         emerg: 'red'
      },
      // Syslog compatible protocol severities.
      levels: {
         debug: 0,
         info: 1,
         notice: 2,
         warning: 3,
         error: 4,
         crit: 5,
         alert: 6,
         emerg: 7
      },
      consoleTransportOptions: {
         level: 'debug',
         handleExceptions: true,
         json: false,
         colorize: true
      },
      fileTransportOptions: {
         level: 'debug',
         filename: './yourapp.log',
         handleExceptions: true,
         json: true,
         maxsize: 5242880, //5MB
         maxFiles: 5,
         colorize: false
      },
      syslogPosixTransportOptions: {
         handleExceptions: true,
         level: 'debug',
         identity: 'yourapp_winston'
         //facility: 'local0' // default
            // /etc/rsyslog.conf also needs: local0.* /var/log/yourapp.log
            // If non posix syslog is used, then /etc/rsyslog.conf or one
            // of the files in /etc/rsyslog.d/ also needs the following
            // two settings:
            // $ModLoad imudp // Load the udp module.
            // $UDPServerRun 514 // Open the standard syslog port.
            // $UDPServerAddress 127.0.0.1 // Interface to bind to.
      },
      emailTransportOptions: {
         handleExceptions: true,
         level: 'crit',
         from: 'yourusername_alerts@fastmail.com',
         to: 'yourusername_alerts@fastmail.com',
         service: 'FastMail',
         auth: {
            user: "yourusername_alerts",
            pass: null // App specific password.
         },
         tags: ['yourapp']
      }
   }
}

In development I have chosen here to not use syslog. You can see this on line 3 below. If you want to test syslog in development, you can either remove the logger object override from the devbox1-development.js file or modify it to be similar to the above. Then add one line to the /etc/rsyslog.conf file to turn on. As mentioned in a comment above in the default.js config file on line 44.

module.exports = {
   logger: {
      syslogPosixTransportOptions: null
   }
}

In production we log to syslog and because of that we do not need the file transport you can see configured starting on line 30 above in the default.js configuration file, so we set it to null as seen on line 6 below in the prodbox-production.js file.

I have gone into more depth about how we handle syslogs here, where all of our logs including these ones get streamed to an off-site syslog server. Thus providing easy aggregation of all system logs into one user interface that DevOpps can watch on their monitoring panels in real-time and also easily go back in time to visit past events. This provides excellent visibility as one layer of defence.

There were also some other options for those using Papertrail as their off-site syslog and aggregation PaaS, but the solutions were not as clean as simply logging to local syslog from your applications and then sending off-site from there.

module.exports = {
   logger: {
      consoleTransportOptions: {
         level: {},
      },
      fileTransportOptions: null,
      syslogPosixTransportOptions: {
         handleExceptions: true,
         level: 'info',
         identity: 'yourapp_winston'
      }
   }
}
// Build creates this file.
module.exports = {
   logger: {
      emailTransportOptions: {
         auth: {
            pass: 'Z-o?(7GnCQsnrx/!-G=LP]-ib' // App specific password.
         }
      }
   }
}

The logger.js file wraps and hides extra features and transports applied to the logging package we are consuming.

var winston = require('winston');
var loggerConfig = require('config').logger;
require('winston-syslog-posix').SyslogPosix;
require('winston-email').Email;

winston.emitErrs = true;

var logger = new winston.Logger({
   // Alternatively: set to winston.config.syslog.levels
   exitOnError: false,
   // Alternatively use winston.addColors(customColours); There are many ways
   // to do the same thing with winston
   colors: loggerConfig.colours,
   levels: loggerConfig.levels
});

// Add transports. There are plenty of options provided and you can add your own.

logger.addConsole = function(config) {
   logger.add (winston.transports.Console, config);
   return this;
};

logger.addFile = function(config) {
   logger.add (winston.transports.File, config);
   return this;
};

logger.addPosixSyslog = function(config) {
   logger.add (winston.transports.SyslogPosix, config);
   return this;
};

logger.addEmail = function(config) {
   logger.add (winston.transports.Email, config);
   return this;
};

logger.emailLoggerFailure = function (err /*level, msg, meta*/) {
   // If called with an error, then only the err param is supplied.
   // If not called with an error, level, msg and meta are supplied.
   if (err) logger.alert(
      JSON.stringify(
         'error-code:' + err.code + '. '
         + 'error-message:' + err.message + '. '
         + 'error-response:' + err.response + '. logger-level:'
         + err.transport.level + '. transport:' + err.transport.name
      )
   );
};

logger.init = function () {
   if (loggerConfig.fileTransportOptions)
      logger.addFile( loggerConfig.fileTransportOptions );
   if (loggerConfig.consoleTransportOptions)
      logger.addConsole( loggerConfig.consoleTransportOptions );
   if (loggerConfig.syslogPosixTransportOptions)
      logger.addPosixSyslog( loggerConfig.syslogPosixTransportOptions );
   if (loggerConfig.emailTransportOptions)
      logger.addEmail( loggerConfig.emailTransportOptions );
};

module.exports = logger;
module.exports.stream = {
   write: function (message, encoding) {
      logger.info(message);
   }
};

When the app first starts it initialises the logger on line 7 below.

//...
var express = require('express');
var morganLogger = require('morgan');
var logger = require('./util/logger'); // Or use requireFrom module so no relative paths.
var app = express();
//...
logger.init();
app.set('port', process.env.PORT || 3000);
app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
app.set('view engine', 'jade');
//...
// In order to utilise connect/express logger module in our third party logger,
// Pipe the messages through.
app.use(morganLogger('combined', {stream: logger.stream}));
//...
app.use(express.static(path.join(__dirname, 'public')));
//...
require('./routes')(app);

if ('development' == app.get('env')) {
   app.use(errorHandler({ dumpExceptions: true, showStack: true }));
   //...
}
if ('production' == app.get('env')) {
   app.use(errorHandler());
   //...
}

http.createServer(app).listen(app.get('port'), function(){
   logger.info(
      "Express server listening on port " + app.get('port') + ' in '
      + process.env.NODE_ENV + ' mode'
   );
});

* You can also optionally log JSON metadata
* You can provide an optional callback to do any work required, which will be called once all transports have logged the specified message.

Here are some examples of how you can use the logger. The logger.log(<level> can be replaced with logger.<level>( where level is any of the levels defined in the default.js configuration file above:

// With string interpolation also.
logger.log('info', 'test message %s', 'my string');
logger.log('info', 'test message %d', 123);
logger.log('info', 'test message %j', {aPropertyName: 'Some message details'}, {});
logger.log('info', 'test message %s, %s', 'first', 'second', {aPropertyName: 'Some message details'});
logger.log('info', 'test message', 'first', 'second', {aPropertyName: 'Some message details'});
logger.log('info', 'test message %s, %s', 'first', 'second', {aPropertyName: 'Some message details'}, logger.emailLoggerFailure);
logger.log('info', 'test message', 'first', 'second', {aPropertyName: 'Some message details'}, logger.emailLoggerFailure);

Also consider hiding cross cutting concerns like logging using Aspect Oriented Programing (AOP)

Insufficient Monitoring

PreventionEASY

There are a couple of ways of approaching monitoring. You may want to see the health of your application even if it is all fine, or only to be notified if it is not fine (sometimes called the dark cockpit approach).

Monit is an excellent tool for the dark cockpit approach. It’s easy to configure. Has excellent short documentation that is easy to understand and the configuration file has lots of examples commented out ready for you to take as is and modify to suite your environment. I’ve personally had excellent success with Monit.

 

Risks that Solution Causes

Lack of Visibility

With the added visibility, you will have to make decisions based on the new found information you now have. There will be no more blissful ignorance if there was before.

Insufficient Logging and Monitoring

There will be learning and work to be done to become familiar with libraries and tooling. Code will have to be written around logging as in wrapping libraries, initialising and adding logging statements or hiding them using AOP.

 

Costs and Trade-offs

Insufficient Logging and Monitoring

You can do a lot for little cost here. I would rather trade off a few days work in order to have a really good logging system through your code base that is going to show you errors fast in development and then show you different errors in the places your DevOps need to see them in production.

Same for monitoring. Find a tool that you find working with a pleasure. There are just about always free and open source tools to every commercial alternative. If you are working with a start-up or young business, the free and open source tools can be excellent to keep ongoing costs down. Especially mature tools that are also well maintained like Monit.

Additional Resources

Consuming Free and Open Source

October 29, 2015

Risks

average-widespread-difficult-moderate

This is where A9 (Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities) of the 2013 OWASP Top 10 comes in.
We are consuming far more free and open source libraries than we have ever before. Much of the code we are pulling into our projects is never intentionally used, but is still adding surface area for attack. Much of it:

  • Is not thoroughly tested (for what it should do and what it should not do). We are often relying
    on developers we do not know a lot about to have not introduced defects. Most developers are more focused on building than breaking, they do not even see the defects they are introducing.
  • Is not reviewed evaluated. That is right, many of the packages we are consuming are created by solo developers with a single focus of creating and little to no focus of how their creations can be exploited. Even some teams with a security hero are not doing a lot better.
  • Is created by amateurs that could and do include vulnerabilities. Anyone can write code and publish to an open source repository. Much of this code ends up in our package management repositories which we consume.
  • Does not undergo the same requirement analysis, defining the scope, acceptance criteria, test conditions and sign off by a development team and product owner that our commercial software does.

Many vulnerabilities can hide in these external dependencies. It is not just one attack vector any more, it provides the opportunity for many vulnerabilities to be sitting waiting to be exploited. If you do not find and deal with them, I can assure you, someone else will. See Justin Searls talk on consuming all the open source.

Running install or any scripts from non local sources without first downloading them and inspecting can destroy or modify your and any other reachable systems, send sensitive information to an attacker, or any number of other criminal activities.

Countermeasures

prevention easy

Process

Dibbe Edwards discusses some excellent initiatives on how they do it at IBM. I will attempt to paraphrase some of them here:

  • Implement process and governance around which open source libraries you can use
  • Legal review: checking licenses
  • Scanning the code for vulnerabilities, manual and automated code review
  • Maintain a list containing all the libraries that have been approved for use. If not on the list, make request and it should go through the same process.
  • Once the libraries are in your product they should become as part of your own code so that they get the same rigour over them as any of your other code written in-house
  • There needs to be automated process that runs over the code base to check that nothing that is not on the approved list is included
  • Consider automating some of the suggested tooling options below

There is an excellent paper by the SANS Institute on Security Concerns in Using Open Source Software for Enterprise Requirements that is well worth a read. It confirms what the likes of IBM are doing in regards to their consumption of free and open source libraries.

Consumption is Your Responsibility

As a developer, you are responsible for what you install and consume. Malicious NodeJS packages do end up on NPM from time to time. The same goes for any source or binary you download and run. The following commands are often encountered as being “the way” to install things:

# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
sh -c "$(wget https://raw.github.com/account/repo/install.sh -O -)"
# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
sh -c "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/account/repo/install.sh)"

Below is the official way to install NodeJS. Do not do this. wget or curl first, then make sure what you have just downloaded is not malicious.

Inspect the code before you run it.

1. The repository could have been tampered with
2. The transmission from the repository to you could have been intercepted and modified.

# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x | sudo -E bash -
sudo apt-get install -y nodejs

Keeping Safe

wget, curl, etc

Please do not wget, curl or fetch in any way and pipe what you think is an installer or any script to your shell without first verifying that what you are about to run is not malicious. Do not download and run in the same command.

The better option is to:

  1. Verify the source that you are about to download, if all good
  2. Download it
  3. Check it again, if all good
  4. Only then should you run it

npm install

As part of an npm install, package creators, maintainers (or even a malicious entity intercepting and modifying your request on the wire) can define scripts to be run on specific NPM hooks. You can check to see if any package has hooks (before installation) that will run scripts by issuing the following command:
npm show [module-you-want-to-install] scripts

Recommended procedure:

  1. Verify the source that you are about to download, if all good
  2. npm show [module-you-want-to-install] scripts
  3. Download the module without installing it and inspect it. You can download it from
    http://registry.npmjs.org/%5Bmodule-you-want-to-install%5D/-/%5Bmodule-you-want-to-install%5D-VERSION.tgz
    

The most important step here is downloading and inspecting before you run.

Doppelganger Packages

Similarly to Doppelganger Domains, People often miss-type what they want to install. If you were someone that wanted to do something malicious like have consumers of your package destroy or modify their systems, send sensitive information to you, or any number of other criminal activities (ideally identified in the Identify Risks section. If not already, add), doppelganger packages are an excellent avenue for raising the likelihood that someone will install your malicious package by miss typing the name of it with the name of another package that has a very similar name. I covered this in my “0wn1ng The Web” presentation, with demos.

Make sure you are typing the correct package name. Copy -> Pasting works.

Tooling

For NodeJS developers: Keep your eye on the nodesecurity advisories. Identified security issues can be posted to NodeSecurity report.

RetireJS Is useful to help you find JavaScript libraries with known vulnerabilities. RetireJS has the following:

  1. Command line scanner
    • Excellent for CI builds. Include it in one of your build definitions and let it do the work for you.
      • To install globally:
        npm i -g retire
      • To run it over your project:
        retire my-project
        Results like the following may be generated:

        public/plugins/jquery/jquery-1.4.4.min.js
        ↳ jquery 1.4.4.min has known vulnerabilities:
        http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/detail?vulnId=CVE-2011-4969
        http://research.insecurelabs.org/jquery/test/
        http://bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11290
        
    • To install RetireJS locally to your project and run as a git precommit-hook.
      There is an NPM package that can help us with this, called precommit-hook, which installs the git pre-commit hook into the usual .git/hooks/pre-commit file of your projects repository. This will allow us to run any scripts immediately before a commit is issued.
      Install both packages locally and save to devDependencies of your package.json. This will make sure that when other team members fetch your code, the same retire script will be run on their pre-commit action.

      npm install precommit-hook --save-dev
      npm install retire --save-dev
      

      If you do not configure the hook via the package.json to run specific scripts, it will run lint, validate and test by default. See the RetireJS documentation for options.

      {
         "name": "my-project",
         "description": "my project does wiz bang",
         "devDependencies": {
            "retire": "~0.3.2",
            "precommit-hook": "~1.0.7"
         },
         "scripts": {
            "validate": "retire -n -j",
            "test": "a-test-script",
            "lint": "jshint --with --different-options"
         }
      }
      

      Adding the pre-commit property allows you to specify which scripts you want run before a successful commit is performed. The following package.json defines that the lint and validate scripts will be run. validate runs our retire command.

      {
         "name": "my-project",
         "description": "my project does wiz bang",
         "devDependencies": {
            "retire": "~0.3.2",
            "precommit-hook": "~1.0.7"
         },
         "scripts": {
            "validate": "retire -n -j",
            "test": "a-test-script",
            "lint": "jshint --with --different-options"
         },
         "pre-commit": ["lint", "validate"]
      }
      

      Keep in mind that pre-commit hooks can be very useful for all sorts of checking of things immediately before your code is committed. For example running security tests using the OWASP ZAP API.

  2. Chrome extension
  3. Firefox extension
  4. Grunt plugin
  5. Gulp task
  6. Burp and OWASP ZAP plugin
  7. On-line tool you can simply enter your web applications URL and the resource will be analysed

requireSafe

provides “intentful auditing as a stream of intel for bithound“. I guess watch this space, as in speaking with Adam Baldwin, there doesn’t appear to be much happening here yet.

bithound

In regards to NPM packages, we know the following things:

  1. We know about a small collection of vulnerable NPM packages. Some of which have high fan-in (many packages depend on them).
  2. The vulnerable packages have published patched versions
  3. Many packages are still consuming the vulnerable unpatched versions of the packages that have published patched versions
    • So although we could have removed a much larger number of vulnerable packages due to their persistence on depending on unpatched packages, we have not. I think this mostly comes down to lack of visibility, awareness and education. This is exactly what I’m trying to change.

bithound supports:

  • JavaScript, TypeScript and JSX (back-end and front-end)
  • In terms of version control systems, only git is supported
  • Opening of bitbucket and github issues
  • Providing statistics on code quality, maintainability and stability. I queried Adam on this, but not a lot of information was forth coming.

bithound can be configured to not analyse some files. Very large repositories are prevented from being analysed due to large scale performance issues.

Analyses both NPM and Bower dependencies and notifies you if any are:

  • Out of date
  • Insecure. Assuming this is based on the known vulnerabilities (41 node advisories at the time of writing this)
  • Unused

Analysis of opensource projects are free.

You could of course just list all of your projects and global packages and check that there are none in the advisories, but this would be more work and who is going to remember to do that all the time?

For .Net developers, there is the likes of OWASP SafeNuGet.

Risks that Solution Causes

Some of the packages we consume may have good test coverage, but are the tests testing the right things? Are the tests testing that something can not happen? That is where the likes of RetireJS comes in.

Process

There is a danger of implementing to much manual process thus slowing development down more than necessary. The way the process is implemented will have a lot to do with its level of success. For example automating as much as possible, so developers don’t have to think about as much as possible is going to make for more productive, focused and happier developers.

For example, when a Development Team needs to pull a library into their project, which often happens in the middle of working on a product backlog item (not planned at the beginning of the Sprint), if they have to context switch while a legal review and/or manual code review takes place, then this will cause friction and reduce the teams performance even though it may be out of their hands.
In this case, the Development Team really needs a dedicated resource to perform the legal review. The manual review could be done by another team member or even themselves with perhaps another team member having a quicker review after the fact. These sorts of decisions need to be made by the Development Team, not mandated by someone outside of the team that doesn’t have skin in the game or does not have the localised understanding that the people working on the project do.

Maintaining a list of the approved libraries really needs to be a process that does not take a lot of human interaction. How ever you work out your process, make sure it does not require a lot of extra developer effort on an ongoing basis. Some effort up front to automate as much as possible will facilitate this.

Tooling

Using the likes of pre-commit hooks, the other tooling options detailed in the Countermeasures section and creating scripts to do most of the work for us is probably going to be a good option to start with.

Costs and Trade-offs

The process has to be streamlined so that it does not get in the developers way. A good way to do this is to ask the developers how it should be done. They know what will get in their way. In order for the process to be a success, the person(s) mandating it will need to get solid buy-in from the people using it (the developers).
The idea of setting up a process that notifies at least the Development Team if a library they want to use has known security defects, needs to be pitched to all stakeholders (developers, product owner, even external stakeholders) the right way. It needs to provide obvious benefit and not make anyones life harder than it already is. Everyone has their own agendas. Rather than fighting against them, include consideration for them in your pitch. I think this sort of a pitch is actually reasonably easy if you keep these factors in mind.

Attributions

Additional Resources

 

Holistic Info-Sec for Web Developers

July 24, 2015

Quick update: Fascicle 0 is now considered Done. Available as an ebook on LeanPub and hard copy on Amazon.

Holistic InfoSec for Web Developers

 

Fascicle 1 is now content complete.

Most of my spare energy is going to be going into my new book for a while. I’m going to be tweeting as I write it, so please follow @binarymist. You can also keep up with my release notes at github. You can also discuss progress or even what you would find helpful as a web developer with a focus on information security, where it’s all happening.

HolisticInfoSecForWebDevelopers

I’ve split the book up into three fascicles to allow the content to be released sooner.