Posts Tagged ‘owasp’

Consuming Free and Open Source

October 29, 2015

Risks

average-widespread-difficult-moderate

This is where A9 (Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities) of the 2013 OWASP Top 10 comes in.
We are consuming far more free and open source libraries than we have ever before. Much of the code we are pulling into our projects is never intentionally used, but is still adding surface area for attack. Much of it:

  • Is not thoroughly tested (for what it should do and what it should not do). We are often relying
    on developers we do not know a lot about to have not introduced defects. Most developers are more focused on building than breaking, they do not even see the defects they are introducing.
  • Is not reviewed evaluated. That is right, many of the packages we are consuming are created by solo developers with a single focus of creating and little to no focus of how their creations can be exploited. Even some teams with a security hero are not doing a lot better.
  • Is created by amateurs that could and do include vulnerabilities. Anyone can write code and publish to an open source repository. Much of this code ends up in our package management repositories which we consume.
  • Does not undergo the same requirement analysis, defining the scope, acceptance criteria, test conditions and sign off by a development team and product owner that our commercial software does.

Many vulnerabilities can hide in these external dependencies. It is not just one attack vector any more, it provides the opportunity for many vulnerabilities to be sitting waiting to be exploited. If you do not find and deal with them, I can assure you, someone else will. See Justin Searls talk on consuming all the open source.

Running install or any scripts from non local sources without first downloading them and inspecting can destroy or modify your and any other reachable systems, send sensitive information to an attacker, or any number of other criminal activities.

Countermeasures

prevention easy

Process

Dibbe Edwards discusses some excellent initiatives on how they do it at IBM. I will attempt to paraphrase some of them here:

  • Implement process and governance around which open source libraries you can use
  • Legal review: checking licenses
  • Scanning the code for vulnerabilities, manual and automated code review
  • Maintain a list containing all the libraries that have been approved for use. If not on the list, make request and it should go through the same process.
  • Once the libraries are in your product they should become as part of your own code so that they get the same rigour over them as any of your other code written in-house
  • There needs to be automated process that runs over the code base to check that nothing that is not on the approved list is included
  • Consider automating some of the suggested tooling options below

There is an excellent paper by the SANS Institute on Security Concerns in Using Open Source Software for Enterprise Requirements that is well worth a read. It confirms what the likes of IBM are doing in regards to their consumption of free and open source libraries.

Consumption is Your Responsibility

As a developer, you are responsible for what you install and consume. Malicious NodeJS packages do end up on NPM from time to time. The same goes for any source or binary you download and run. The following commands are often encountered as being “the way” to install things:

# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
sh -c "$(wget https://raw.github.com/account/repo/install.sh -O -)"
# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
sh -c "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/account/repo/install.sh)"

Below is the official way to install NodeJS. Do not do this. wget or curl first, then make sure what you have just downloaded is not malicious.

Inspect the code before you run it.

1. The repository could have been tampered with
2. The transmission from the repository to you could have been intercepted and modified.

# Fetching install.sh and running immediately in your shell.
# Do not do this. Download first -> Check and verify good -> run if good.
curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x | sudo -E bash -
sudo apt-get install -y nodejs

Keeping Safe

wget, curl, etc

Please do not wget, curl or fetch in any way and pipe what you think is an installer or any script to your shell without first verifying that what you are about to run is not malicious. Do not download and run in the same command.

The better option is to:

  1. Verify the source that you are about to download, if all good
  2. Download it
  3. Check it again, if all good
  4. Only then should you run it

npm install

As part of an npm install, package creators, maintainers (or even a malicious entity intercepting and modifying your request on the wire) can define scripts to be run on specific NPM hooks. You can check to see if any package has hooks (before installation) that will run scripts by issuing the following command:
npm show [module-you-want-to-install] scripts

Recommended procedure:

  1. Verify the source that you are about to download, if all good
  2. npm show [module-you-want-to-install] scripts
  3. Download the module without installing it and inspect it. You can download it from
    http://registry.npmjs.org/%5Bmodule-you-want-to-install%5D/-/%5Bmodule-you-want-to-install%5D-VERSION.tgz
    

The most important step here is downloading and inspecting before you run.

Doppelganger Packages

Similarly to Doppelganger Domains, People often miss-type what they want to install. If you were someone that wanted to do something malicious like have consumers of your package destroy or modify their systems, send sensitive information to you, or any number of other criminal activities (ideally identified in the Identify Risks section. If not already, add), doppelganger packages are an excellent avenue for raising the likelihood that someone will install your malicious package by miss typing the name of it with the name of another package that has a very similar name. I covered this in my “0wn1ng The Web” presentation, with demos.

Make sure you are typing the correct package name. Copy -> Pasting works.

Tooling

For NodeJS developers: Keep your eye on the nodesecurity advisories. Identified security issues can be posted to NodeSecurity report.

RetireJS Is useful to help you find JavaScript libraries with known vulnerabilities. RetireJS has the following:

  1. Command line scanner
    • Excellent for CI builds. Include it in one of your build definitions and let it do the work for you.
      • To install globally:
        npm i -g retire
      • To run it over your project:
        retire my-project
        Results like the following may be generated:

        public/plugins/jquery/jquery-1.4.4.min.js
        ↳ jquery 1.4.4.min has known vulnerabilities:
        http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/vuln/detail?vulnId=CVE-2011-4969
        http://research.insecurelabs.org/jquery/test/
        http://bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11290
        
    • To install RetireJS locally to your project and run as a git precommit-hook.
      There is an NPM package that can help us with this, called precommit-hook, which installs the git pre-commit hook into the usual .git/hooks/pre-commit file of your projects repository. This will allow us to run any scripts immediately before a commit is issued.
      Install both packages locally and save to devDependencies of your package.json. This will make sure that when other team members fetch your code, the same retire script will be run on their pre-commit action.

      npm install precommit-hook --save-dev
      npm install retire --save-dev
      

      If you do not configure the hook via the package.json to run specific scripts, it will run lint, validate and test by default. See the RetireJS documentation for options.

      {
         "name": "my-project",
         "description": "my project does wiz bang",
         "devDependencies": {
            "retire": "~0.3.2",
            "precommit-hook": "~1.0.7"
         },
         "scripts": {
            "validate": "retire -n -j",
            "test": "a-test-script",
            "lint": "jshint --with --different-options"
         }
      }
      

      Adding the pre-commit property allows you to specify which scripts you want run before a successful commit is performed. The following package.json defines that the lint and validate scripts will be run. validate runs our retire command.

      {
         "name": "my-project",
         "description": "my project does wiz bang",
         "devDependencies": {
            "retire": "~0.3.2",
            "precommit-hook": "~1.0.7"
         },
         "scripts": {
            "validate": "retire -n -j",
            "test": "a-test-script",
            "lint": "jshint --with --different-options"
         },
         "pre-commit": ["lint", "validate"]
      }
      

      Keep in mind that pre-commit hooks can be very useful for all sorts of checking of things immediately before your code is committed. For example running security tests using the OWASP ZAP API.

  2. Chrome extension
  3. Firefox extension
  4. Grunt plugin
  5. Gulp task
  6. Burp and OWASP ZAP plugin
  7. On-line tool you can simply enter your web applications URL and the resource will be analysed

requireSafe

provides “intentful auditing as a stream of intel for bithound“. I guess watch this space, as in speaking with Adam Baldwin, there doesn’t appear to be much happening here yet.

bithound

In regards to NPM packages, we know the following things:

  1. We know about a small collection of vulnerable NPM packages. Some of which have high fan-in (many packages depend on them).
  2. The vulnerable packages have published patched versions
  3. Many packages are still consuming the vulnerable unpatched versions of the packages that have published patched versions
    • So although we could have removed a much larger number of vulnerable packages due to their persistence on depending on unpatched packages, we have not. I think this mostly comes down to lack of visibility, awareness and education. This is exactly what I’m trying to change.

bithound supports:

  • JavaScript, TypeScript and JSX (back-end and front-end)
  • In terms of version control systems, only git is supported
  • Opening of bitbucket and github issues
  • Providing statistics on code quality, maintainability and stability. I queried Adam on this, but not a lot of information was forth coming.

bithound can be configured to not analyse some files. Very large repositories are prevented from being analysed due to large scale performance issues.

Analyses both NPM and Bower dependencies and notifies you if any are:

  • Out of date
  • Insecure. Assuming this is based on the known vulnerabilities (41 node advisories at the time of writing this)
  • Unused

Analysis of opensource projects are free.

You could of course just list all of your projects and global packages and check that there are none in the advisories, but this would be more work and who is going to remember to do that all the time?

For .Net developers, there is the likes of OWASP SafeNuGet.

Risks that Solution Causes

Some of the packages we consume may have good test coverage, but are the tests testing the right things? Are the tests testing that something can not happen? That is where the likes of RetireJS comes in.

Process

There is a danger of implementing to much manual process thus slowing development down more than necessary. The way the process is implemented will have a lot to do with its level of success. For example automating as much as possible, so developers don’t have to think about as much as possible is going to make for more productive, focused and happier developers.

For example, when a Development Team needs to pull a library into their project, which often happens in the middle of working on a product backlog item (not planned at the beginning of the Sprint), if they have to context switch while a legal review and/or manual code review takes place, then this will cause friction and reduce the teams performance even though it may be out of their hands.
In this case, the Development Team really needs a dedicated resource to perform the legal review. The manual review could be done by another team member or even themselves with perhaps another team member having a quicker review after the fact. These sorts of decisions need to be made by the Development Team, not mandated by someone outside of the team that doesn’t have skin in the game or does not have the localised understanding that the people working on the project do.

Maintaining a list of the approved libraries really needs to be a process that does not take a lot of human interaction. How ever you work out your process, make sure it does not require a lot of extra developer effort on an ongoing basis. Some effort up front to automate as much as possible will facilitate this.

Tooling

Using the likes of pre-commit hooks, the other tooling options detailed in the Countermeasures section and creating scripts to do most of the work for us is probably going to be a good option to start with.

Costs and Trade-offs

The process has to be streamlined so that it does not get in the developers way. A good way to do this is to ask the developers how it should be done. They know what will get in their way. In order for the process to be a success, the person(s) mandating it will need to get solid buy-in from the people using it (the developers).
The idea of setting up a process that notifies at least the Development Team if a library they want to use has known security defects, needs to be pitched to all stakeholders (developers, product owner, even external stakeholders) the right way. It needs to provide obvious benefit and not make anyones life harder than it already is. Everyone has their own agendas. Rather than fighting against them, include consideration for them in your pitch. I think this sort of a pitch is actually reasonably easy if you keep these factors in mind.

Attributions

Additional Resources

 

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Holistic Info-Sec for Web Developers

July 24, 2015

Quick update: Fascicle 0 is now considered Done. Available as an ebook on LeanPub and hard copy on Amazon.

Holistic InfoSec for Web Developers

 

Fascicle 1 is now content complete.

Most of my spare energy is going to be going into my new book for a while. I’m going to be tweeting as I write it, so please follow @binarymist. You can also keep up with my release notes at github. You can also discuss progress or even what you would find helpful as a web developer with a focus on information security, where it’s all happening.

HolisticInfoSecForWebDevelopers

I’ve split the book up into three fascicles to allow the content to be released sooner.

 

Up and Running with Kali Linux and Friends

March 29, 2014

When it comes to measuring the security posture of an application or network, the best defence against an attacker is offence. What does that mean? It means your best defence is to have someone with your best interests (generally employed by you), if we’re talking about your asset, assess the vulnerabilities of your asset and attempt to exploit them.

In the words of Offensive Security (Creators of Kali Linux), Kali Linux is an advanced Penetration Testing and Security Auditing Linux distribution. For those that are familiar with BackTrack, basically Kali is a new creation based on Debian rather than Ubuntu, with significant improvements over BackTrack.

When it comes to actually getting Kali on some hardware, there is a multitude of options available.

All externally listening services by default are disabled, but very easy to turn on if/when required. The idea being to reduce chances of detecting the presence of Kali.

I’ve found the Kali Linux documentation to be of a high standard and plentiful.

In this article I’ll go over getting Kali Linux installed and set-up. I’ll go over a few of the packages in a low level of detail (due to the share number of them) that come out of the box. On top of that I’ll also go over a few programmes I like to install separately. In a subsequent article I’d like to continue with additional programmes that come with Kali Linux as there are just to many to cover in one go.

System Requirements

  1. Minimum of 8 GB disk space is required for the Kali install
  2. Minimum RAM 512 MB
  3. CD/DVD Drive or USB boot support

Supported Hardware

Officially supported architectures

i386, amd64, ARM (armel and armhf)

Unofficial (but maintained) images

You can download official Kali Linux images for the following, these are maintained on a best effort basis by Offensive Security.

  • VMware (pre-made vm with VMware tools installed)

ARM images

  • rk3306 mk/ss808CPU: dual-core 1.6 GHz A9

    RAM: 1 GB

  • Raspberry Pi
  • ODROID U2CPU: quad-core 1.7 GHz

    RAM: 2GB

    Ethernet: 10/100Mbps

  • ODROID X2CPU: quad-core Cortex-A9 MPCore

    RAM: 2GB

    USB 2: 6 ports

    Ethernet: 10/100Mbps

  • MK802/MK802 II
  • Samsung Chromebook
  • Galaxy Note 10.1
  • CuBox
  • Efika MX
  • BeagleBone Black

Create a Customised Kali Image

Kali also provides a simple way to create your own ISO image from the latest source. You can include the packages you want and exclude the ones you don’t. You can customise the kernel. The options are virtually limitless.

The default desktop environment is Gnome, but Kali also provides an easy way to configure which desktop environment you use before building your custom ISO image.

The alternative options provided are: KDE, LXDE, XFCE, I3WM and MATE.

Kali has really embraced the Debian ethos of being able to be run on pretty well any hardware with extreme flexibility. This is great to see.

Installation

You should find most if not all of what you need here. Just follow the links specific to your requirements.

As with BackTrack, the default user is “root” without the quotes. If your installing, make sure you use a decent password. Not a dictionary word or similar. It’s generally a good idea to use a mix of upper case, lower case characters, numbers and special characters and of a decent length.

I’m not going to repeat what’s already documented on the Kali site, as I think they’ve done a pretty good job of it already, but I will go over some things that I think may not be 100% clear at first attempt. Also just to be clear, I’ve done this on a Linux box.

Now once you have down loaded the image that suites your target platform,

you’re going to want to check its validity by verifying the SHA1 checksums. Now this is where the instructions can be a little confusing. You’ll need to make sure that the SHA1SUMS file that contains the specific checksum you’re going to use to verify the checksum of the image you downloaded, is in fact the authentic SHA1SUMS file. instructions say “When you download an image, be sure to download the SHA1SUMS and SHA1SUMS.gpg files that are next to the downloaded image (i.e. in the same directory on the server).”. You’ve got to read between the lines a bit here. A little further down the page has the key to where these files are. It’s buried in a wget command. Plus you have to add another directory to find them. The location was here. Now that you’ve got these two files downloaded in the same directory, verify the SHA1SUMS.gpg signature as follows:

$ gpg --verify SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS
gpg: Signature made Thu 25 Jul 2013 08:05:16 NZST using RSA key ID 7D8D0BF6
gpg: Good signature from "Kali Linux Repository <devel@kali.org>

You’ll also get a warning about the key not being certified with a trusted signature.

Now verify the checksum of the image you downloaded with the checksum within the (authentic) SHA1SUMS file

Compare the output of the following two commands. They should be the same.

# Calculate the checksum of your downloaded image file.
$ sha1sum [name of your downloaded image file]
# Print the checksum from the SHA1SUMS file for your specific downloaded image file name.
$ grep [name of your downloaded image file] SHA1SUMS

Kali also has a live USB Install including persistence to your USB drive.

Community

IRC: #kali-linux on FreeNode. Stick to the rules.

What’s Included

> 300 security programmes packaged with the operating system:

Before installation you can view the tools included in the Kali repository.

Or once installed by issuing the following command:

# prints complete list of installed packages.
dpkg --get-selections | less

To find out a little more about the application:

dpkg-query -l '*[some text you think may exist in the package name]*'

Or if you know the package name your after:

dpkg -l [package name]

Want more info still?

man [package name]

Some of the notable applications installed by default

Metasploit

Framework that provides the infrastructure to create, re-use and automate a wide variety of exploitation tasks.

If you require database support for Metasploit, start the postgresql service.

# I like to see the ports that get opened, so I run ss -ant before and after starting the services.
ss -ant
service postgresql start
ss -ant

ss or “socket statistics” which is a new replacement programme for the old netstat command. ss gets its information from kernel space via Netlink.

Start the Metasploit service:

ss -ant
service metasploit start
ss -ant

When you start the metasploit service, it will create a database and user, both with the names msf3, providing you have your database service started. Now you can run msfconsole.

Start msfconsole:

msfconsole

The following is an image of terminator where I use the top pane for stopping/starting services, middle pane for checking which ports are opened/closed, bottom pane for running msfconsole. terminator is not installed by default. It’s as simple as apt-get install terminator

metasploit

You can find full details of setting up Metasploits database and start/stopping the services here.

You can also find the Metasploit frameworks database commands simply by typing help database at the msf prompt.

# Print the switches that you can run msfconsole with.
msfconsole -h

Once your in msf type help at the prompt to get yourself started.

There is also a really easy to navigate all encompassing set of documentation provided for msfconsole here.

You can also set-up PostgreSQL and Metasploit to launch on start-up like this:

update-rc.d postgresql enable
update-rc.d metasploit enable

Offensive Security also has a Metasploit online course here.

Armitage

Just as it was included in BackTrack, which is no longer supporting Armitage, you’ll also find Armitage comes installed out of the box in version 1.0.4 of Kali Linux. Armitage is a GUI to assist in metasploit visualisation. You can find the official documentation here. Offensive Security has also done a good job of providing their own documentation for Armitage over here. To get started with Armitage, just make sure you’ve got the postgresql service running. Armitage will start the metasploit service for you if it’s not already running. Armitage allows your red team to collaborate by using a single instance of Metasploit. There is also a commercial offering developed by Raphael Mudge’s company “Strategic Cyber LLC” which also created Armitage, called Cobalt Strike. Cobalt Strike currently costs $2500 per user per year. There is a 21 day trial though. Cobalt Strike offers a bunch of great features. Check them out here. Armitage can connect to an existing instance of Metasploit on another host.

NMap

Target use is network discovery and auditing. Provides host information for anything it can access from a network. Also now has a scripting engine that can execute arbitrary custom tasks.

I’m guessing we’ve probably all used NMap? ZenMap which Kali Linux also provides out of the box Is a gui for NMap. This was also included in BackTrack.

Intercepting Web Proxies

Burp Suite

I use burp quite regularly and have a few blog posts where I’ve detailed some of it’s use. In fact I’ve used it to reverse engineer the comms between VMware vSphere and ESXi to create a UPS solution that deals with not only virtual hosts but also the clients.

WebScarab

I haven’t really found out what webscarab’s sweet spot is if it has one. I’d love to know what it does better than burp, zap and w3af combined? There is also a next generation version which according to the google code repository hasn’t had any work done on it since March 2011, where as the classic version is still receiving fixes. The documentation has always seemed fairly minimalistic also.

In terms of web proxy/interceptors I’ve also used fiddler which relies on the .NET framework and as mono is not installed out of the box on Kali, neither is fiddler.

OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP)

Which is an OWASP flagship project, so it’s free and open source. Cross platform. It was forked from the Paros Proxy project which is not longer supported. Includes automated, passive, brute force and port scanners. Traditional and AJAX spiders. Can even find unlinked files. Provides fuzzing, port scanning. Can be run without the UI in headless mode and can be accessed via a REST API. Supports Anti CSRF tokens. The Script Console that is one of the add-ons supports any language that JSR (Java Specification Requests) 223 supports. That’s languages such as JavaScript Groovy, Python, Ruby and many more. There is plenty of info on the add-ons here. OWASP also provide directions on how to write your own extensions and they provide some sample templates. Following is the list of current extensions, which can also be managed from within Zap. “Manage Add-ons” menu → Marketplace tab. Select and click “Install Selected”

OWASP Zap

The idea is to first set Zap up as a proxy for your browser. Fetch some web pages (build history). Zap will create a history of URLs. You then right click the item of interest and click Attack->[one of the spider options], then click the play button and watch the progress bar. which will crawl all the pages you have access to according to your permissions. Then under the Analyse menu → Scan Policy… Setup your scan policy so your only scanning what you want to scan. Then hit Scan to assess your target application. Out of the box, you’ve got many scan options. Zap does a lot for you. I’m really loving this tool OWASP!

As usual with OWASP, zap has a wealth of documentation. If zap doesn’t provide enough out of the box, extend it. OWASP also provide an API for zap.

You can find the user group here (also accessible from the ZAP ‘Online’ menu.), which is good for getting help if the help file (which can also be found via ZAP itself) fails to yeild. There is also a getting started guide which is a work in progress. There is also the ZAP Blog.

FoxyProxy

Although nothing to do with Kali Linux and could possibly be in the IceWeasel add-ons section below, I’ve added it here instead as it really reduces friction with web proxy interception. FoxyProxy is a very handy add-on for both firefox and chromium. Although it seems to have more options for firefox, or at least they are more easily accessible. It allows you to set-up a list of proxies and then switch between them as you need. When I run chromium as a non root user I can’t change the proxy settings once the browser is running. I have to run the following command in order to set the proxy to my intermediary before run time like this:

chromium-browser --temp-profile –proxy-server=localhost:3001

Firefox is a little easier, but neither browsers allow you to build up lists of proxies and then switch them in mid flight. FoxyProxy provides a menu button, so with two clicks you can disable the add-on completely to revert to your previous settings, or select any or your predefined proxies. This is a real time saver.

Vulnerability Scanners

Open Vulnerability Assessment System (OpenVAS)

Forked from the last free version (closed in 2005) of Nessus. OpenVAS plugins are written in the same language that Nessus uses. OpenVAS looks for known misconfigurations and vulnerabilities common in out of date software. In fact it covers the following OWASP Top 10 items:

  • No.5 Security Misconfiguration
  • No.7 Missing Function Level Access Control (formerly known as “failure to restrict URL access”)
  • No.9 Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities.

OpenVAS also has some SQLi and other probes to test application input, but it’s primary purpose is to scan networks of machines with out of date software and bad configurations.

Tests continue to be added. Now currently at 32413 Network Vulnerability Tests (NVTs) details here.

OpenVAS

Greenbone Security Desktop (gsd) who’s package is a GUI that uses the Greenbone Security Manager, OpenVAS Manager or any other service that offers the OpenVAS Management Protocol (omp) protocol. Currently at version 1.2.2 and licensed under the GPLv2. The Greenbone Security Assistant (gsad) is currently at version 4.0.0. The Germany government also sponsor OpenVAS.

From the menu: Kali Linux → Vulnerability Analysis → OpenVAS, we have a couple of short-cuts visible. openvas-gsd is actually just the gsd package and openvas-setup which is the set-up script.

Before you run openvas-gsd, you can either:

  1. Run openvas-setup which will do all the setup which I think is already done on Kali. At the end of this, you will be prompted to add a password for a user to the Admin role. The password you add here is for a new user called “admin” (of course it doesn’t say that, so can be a little confusing as to what the password is for).
  2. Or you can just run the following command, which is much quicker because you don’t run the set-up procedure:
openvasad -c 'add_user' -n [a new administrative username of your choosing] -r Admin

You’ll be prompted to add a new password. Make sure you remember it.

Check out the man page for further options. For example the -c switch is a shortened –command and it lists a selection of commands you can use.

I think -n is for –name although not listed in the man page. -r switch is –role. Either User or Admin.

The user you’ve just added is used to connect the gsd to the:

  1. openvasmd (OpenVAS Manager daemon) which listens on port 9390
  2. openvassd (OpenVAS Scanner daemon) which listens on port 9391
  3. gsad (Greenbone Security Assistant daemon) which listens on port 9392. This is a web app, which also listens on port 443
  4. openvasad (OpenVAS Administrator daemon) which listens on 9393

The core functionality is provided by the scanner and the manager. The manager handles and organises scan results. The gsad or assistant connects to the manager and administrator to provide a fully featured user interface. There is also a CLI (omp) but I haven’t been able to get this going on Kali Linux yet. You’ll also find that the previous link has links to all the man pages for OpenVAS. You can read more about the architecture and how the different components fit together.

I’ve also found that sometimes the daemons don’t automatically start when gsd starts. So you have to start them manually.

openvasmd && openvassd && gsad && openvasad

You can also use the web app https://127.0.0.1/omp

Then try logging in to the openvasmd. When your finished with gsd you can kill the running daemons if you like. I like to keep an eye on the listening ports when I’m done to keep things as quite as possible.

Check the ports.

ss -anp

Optional to see the processes running, but not necessary.

ps -e
kill -9 <PID of openvasad> <PID of gsad> <PID of openvassd> <PID of openvasmd>

There are also plenty of options when it comes to the report. This can be output in HTML, PDF, XML, Emailed and quite a few others. The reports are colour coded and you can choose what to have put in them. The vulnerabilities are classified by risk: High, Medium, Low, OpenVAS can take quite a while to scan as it runs so many tests.

This is how to get started with gsd.

Web Vulnerability Scanners

This is the generally accepted criteria of a tool to be considered a Web Application Security Scanner.

SkipFish

A high performance active reconnaissance tool written in C. From the documentation “Multiplexing single-thread, fully asynchronous network I/O and data processing model that eliminates memory management, scheduling, and IPC inefficiencies present in some multi-threaded clients.”. OK. So it’s fast.

which prepares an interactive sitemap by carrying out a recursive crawl and probes based on existing dictionaries or ones you build up yourself. Further details in the documentation linked below.

Doesn’t conform to most of the criteria outlined in the above Web Application Security Scanner criteria.

SkipFish v2.05 is the current version packaged with Kali Linux.

SkipFish v2.10b (released Dec 2012)

Free and you can view the source code. Apache license 2.0

Performs a similar role to w3af.

Project details can be found here.

You can find the tests here.

How do you use it though? This is a good place to start. Instead of reading through the non-existent doc/dictionaries.txt, I think you can do as well by reading through /usr/share/skipfish/dictionaries/README-FIRST.

The other two documentation sources are the man page and skipfish with the -h option.

Web Application Attack and Audit Framework (w3af)

Andres Riancho has created a masterpiece. The main behavior of this application is to assess and identify vulnerabilities in a web application by sending customised HTTP requests. Results can be output in quite a few formats including email. It can also proxy, but burp suite is more focused on this role and does it well.

Can be run with a gui: w3af_gui or from the terminal: w3af_console. Written in Python and Runs on Linux BSD or Mac. Older versions used to work on Windows, but it’s not currently being tested on Windows. Open source on GitHub and released under the GPLv2 license.

You can write your own plug-ins, but check first to make sure it doesn’t already exist. The plugins are listed within the application and on the w3af.org web site along with links to their source code, unit tests and descriptions. If it doesn’t appear that the plug-in you want exists, contact Andres Riancho to make sure, write it and submit a pull request. Also looks like Andres Riancho is driving the development TDD style, which means he’s obviously serious about creating quality software. Well done Andres!

w3af provides the ability to inject your payloads into almost every part of the HTTP request by way of it’s fuzzing engine. Including: query string, POST data, headers, cookie values, content of form files, URL file-names and paths.

There’s a good set of documentation found here and you can watch the training videos. I’m really looking forward to using this in anger.

w3af

Nikto

Is a web server scanner that’s not overly stealthy. It’s built on “Rain Forest Puppies” LIbWhisker2 which has a BSD license.

Nikto is free and open source with GPLv3 license. Can be run on any platform that runs a perl interpreter. It’s source can be found here. The first release of Nikto was in December of 2001 and is still under active development. Pull requests encouraged.

Suports SSL. Supports HTTP proxies, so you can see what Nikto is actually sending. Host authentication. Attack encoding. Update local databases and plugins via the -update argument. Checks for server configuration items like multiple index files and HTTP server options. Attempts to identify installed web servers and software.

Looks like the LibWhisker web site no longer exists. Last release of LibWhisker was at the beginning of 2010.

Nikto v2.1.4 (Released Feb 20 2011) is the current version packaged with Kali Linux. Tests for multiple items, including > 6400 potentially dangerous files/CGIs. Outdated versions of > 1200 servers. Insecurities of specific versions of > 270 servers.

Nikto v2.1.5 (released Sep 16 2012) is the latest version. Tests for multiple items, including > 6500 potentially dangerous files/CGIs. Outdated versions of > 1250 servers. Insecurities of specific versions of > 270 servers.

Just spoke with the Kali developers about the old version. They are now building a package of 2.1.5 as I write this. So should be an apt-get update && apt-get upgrade away by the time you read this all going well. Actually I can see it in the repo now. Man those guys are responsive!

Most of the info you will need can be found here.

SQLNinja

sqlninja: Targets Microsoft SQL Servers. Uses SQL injection vulnerabilities on a web app. Focuses on popping remote shells on the target database server and uses them to gain a foothold over the target network. You can set-up graphical access via a VNC server injection. Can upload executables by using HTTP requests via vbscript or debug.exe. Supports direct and reverse bindshell. Quite a few other methods of obtaining access. Documentation here.

Text Editors

  1. Vim. Shouldn’t need much explanation.
  2. Leafpad. This is a very basic graphical text editor. A bit like Windows Notepad.
  3. Gvim. This is the Graphical version of Vim. I’ve mostly used sublime text 2 & 3, gedit on Linux, but Gvim is really quite powerful too.

Note Keeping

  1. KeepNote. Supported on Linux, Windows and MacOS X. Easy to transport notes by zipping or copying a folder. Notes stored in HTML and XML.
  2. Zim Desktop Wiki.

Other Notable Features

  • Offensive Securities Kali Linux is free and always will be. It’s also completely open (as it’s based on debian) to modification of it’s OS or programmes.
  • FHS compliant. That means the file system complies to the Linux Filesystem Hierarchy Standard
  • Wireless device support is vast. Including USB devices.
  • Forensics Mode. As with BackTrack 5, the Kali ISO also has an option to boot into the forensic mode. No drives are written to (including swap). No drives will be auto mounted upon insertion.

Customising installed Kali

Wireless Card

I had a little trouble with my laptop wireless card not being activated. Turned out to be me just not realising that an external wi-fi switch had to be turned on. I had wireless enabled in the BIOS. The following where the steps I took to resolve it:

Read Kali Linux documentation on Troubleshooting Wireless Drivers  and found the card listed with lspci. Opened /var/log/dmesg with vi. Searched for the name of the card:

#From command mode to make search case insensitive:
:set ic
#From command mode to search
/[name of my wireless card]

There were no errors. So ran iwconfig (similar to ifconfig but dedicated to wireless interfaces). I noticed that the card was definitely present and the Tx-Power was off. I then thought I’d give rfkill a spin and it’s output made me realise I must have missed a hardware switch somewhere.

rfkill

Found the hard switch and turned it on and we now have wireless.

Adding Shortcuts to your Panel

[Alt]+[right click]->[Add to Panel…]

Or if your Kali install is on VirtualBox:

[Windows]+[Alt]+[right click]->[Add to Panel…]

Caching Debian Packages

If you want to:

  1. save on bandwidth
  2. have a large number of your packages delivered at your network speed rather than your internet speed
  3. have several debian based machines on your network

I’d recommend using apt-cacher-ng. If not already, you’ll have to set this up on a server and add the following file to each of your debian based machines.

/etc/apt/apt.conf with the following contents and set it’s permissions to be the same as your sources.list:

Acquire::http::Proxy “http://[ip address of your apt-cacher server]:3142”;

IceWeasel add-ons

  • Firebug
  • NoScript
  • Web Developer
  • FoxyProxy (more details mentioned above)
  • HackBar. Somewhat useful for (en/de)coding (Base64, Hex, MD5, SHA-(1/256), etc), manipulating and splitting URLs

SQL Inject Me

Nothing to do with Kali Linux, but still a good place to start for running a quick vulnerability assessment. Open source software (GPLv3) from Security Compass Labs. SQL Inject Me is a component of the Exploit-Me suite. Allows you to test all or any number of input fields on all or any of a pages forms. You just fill in the fields with valid data, then test with all the tools attacks or with the top that you’ve defined in the options menu. It then looks for database errors which are rendered into the returned HTML as a result of sending escape strings, so doesn’t cater for blind injection. You can also add remove escape strings and resulting error strings that SQL Inject Me should look for on response. The order in which each escape string can be tried can also be changed. All you need to know can be found here.

XSS Me

Nothing to do with Kali Linux, but still a good place to start for running a quick vulnerability assessment. Open source software (GPLv3) from Security Compass Labs. XSS Me is also a component of the Exploit-Me suite. This tool’s behaviour is very similar to SQL Inject Me (follows the POLA) which makes using the tools very easy. Both these add-ons have next to no learning curve. The level of entry is very low and I think are exactly what web developers that make excuses for not testing their own security need. The other thing is that it helps developers understand how these attacks can be carried out. XSS Me currently only tests for reflected XSS. It doesn’t attempt to compromise the security of the target system. Both XSS Me and SQL Inject Me are reconnaissance tools, where the information is the vulnerabilities found. XSS Me doesn’t support stored XSS or user supplied data from sources such as cookies, links, or HTTP headers. How effective XSS Me is in finding vulnerabilities is also determined by the list of attack strings the tool has available. Out of the box the list of XSS attack strings are derived from RSnakes collection which were donated to OWASP who now maintains it as one of their cheatsheets.. Multiple encodings are not yet supported, but are planned for the future. You can help to keep the collection up to date by submitting new attack strings.

Chromium

Because it’s got great developer tools that I’m used to using. In order to run this under the root account, you’ll need to add the following parameter to /etc/chromium/default between the quotes for CHROMIUM_FLAGS=””

--user-data-dir

I like to install the following extensions: Cookies, ScriptSafe

Terminator

Because I like a more powerful console than the default. Terminator adds split screen on top of multi tabs. If you live at the command line, you owe it to yourself to get the best console you can find. So far terminator still fits this bill for me.

KeePass

The password database app. Because I like passwords to be long, complex, unique for everything and as secure as possible.

Exploits

I was going to go over a few exploits we could carry out with the Kali Linux set-up, but I ran out of time and page space. In fact there are still many tools I wanted to review, but there just isn’t enough time or room in this article. Feel free to subscribe to my blog and you’ll get an update when I make posts. I’d like to extend on this by reviewing more of the tools offered in Kali Linux

Input Sanitisation

This has been one of my pet topics for a while. Why? Because the lack of it is so often abused. In fact this is one of the primary techniques for No.1 (Injection) and No.3 (XSS) of this years OWASP Top 10 List (unchanged from 2010). I’d encourage any serious web developers to look at my Sanitising User Input From Browser. Part 1” and Part 2

Part 1 deals with the client side (untrused) code.

Part 2 deals with the server side (trusted) code.

I provide source code, sources and discuss the following topics:

  1. Minimising the attack surface
  2. Defining maximum field lengths (validation)
  3. Determining a white list of allowable characters (validation)
  4. Escaping untrusted data
  5. External libraries, cheat sheets, useful code and sites, I used. Also discuss the less useful resources and why.
  6. The point of validating client side when the server side is going to do it again anyway
  7. Full set of server side tests to test the sanitisation is doing what is expected